Response to “What’s in the children’s section of YOUR library?”

The Library Think Tank group on FB recently posted a link to a video from a woman (some sort of lifestyle vlogger, I think) who has some pretty strong views on library materials and programs.

I won’t post her video here, but it is called “What’s in the children’s section of YOUR library?”

vloggerlady

The woman lives in the US, but I saw some Canadians responding in her comment section too. As a Canadian who has a Bachelor of Education, who has been working in a public library for over 7 years, and who will beginning my Master of Library and Information Studies program in the fall, I’d like to respond with my thoughts on some of the comments made in this woman’s passionate rant video.

 

“For a long time I took my kids to the library every week. I want my kids to read. I want them to develop a love of reading”

That’s wonderful. I wish more families would visit the library regularly.

 

“I brought my kid here because I thought we were going to read something like Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel but that’s not what’s happening here. (They’re) trying to indoctrinate your kids”

“they read a story about a little boy who thought he was a girl…”

“the least you can do is tell parents hey, this story is pushing an agenda.”

It is unfortunate that you thought the story-time was not acceptable for your kids, but many other parents value diverse stories and want their kids to learn about families, children, and people who are different from them. Reading about people who are different than you is one of the best ways to develop empathy.

The only agenda being pushed here is a reflection of realitybased on the life experiences of many kids and people in this world. Whether you are comfortable with it or not, the library is for everyone, not just you. 

 

 “Drag queens are public libraries newest storytellers… when did it become the responsibility of the library to bring cross-dressers in to read stories to our children? I’d really love to know… this is not why we bring our kids to the library. We bring them… so they can improve their reading skills”

“Stop bringing drag queens into our library!”

As long as we live in a world where marginalized people are discriminated against, bullied, harassed, assaulted and denied equal rights in society, libraries have a responsibility to give these people voices and to make every effort to enlighten the general public that people who are different than you are not some faceless “other” to fear.

LGBTQ+ people face bullying, hate crimes, discrimination, and violence- even execution- just for being themselves.

We cannot hope to face discrimination, bullying and violence against LGBTQ+ people without making efforts to change the culture that promotes these actions in the first place. 

If you aren’t comfortable attending a Drag Queen Story Time, it’s simple- don’t go. Walk away. It’s your choice. Don’t try to take away the choice from others.

 

 “THIS IS NOT ABOUT CENSORSHIP. THIS IS ABOUT Y’ALL PUSHING STUFF ONTO OUR CHILDREN. COULD YOU JUST STOP ALREADY?”

“These are books with profanities, about sexual violence, suicide, transgenderism, homosexuality… suicide… hey, we love you library, but could you just not bring this stuff up to my kids?”

“I don’t care if you carry this stuff in your library, but the least you can do is make a section for it so that parents know what their children are reading”

“put it under gay and lesbian studies. Put it under transgenderism”

What you are advocating here IS a form of censorship.

Censorship doesn’t just mean outright banning of books, withdrawing them from the library system. Restricting certain titles and making an effort to hide them away or make them less accessible is an act of censorship. 

The library doesn’t push content on you. They provide a wide variety of materials- libraries have something for everyone. Our collections are ever-growing to reflect the diversity of our communities and our world, and to highlight a variety of perspectives on any given subject.

Libraries strive to give access to information. Again, if you want to censor what your child has access to, that’s on YOU as the parent. 

LGBTQ+ people are more than their chosen labels, or the labels we assign them. They are people with hopes, dreams, hobbies, and interests just like you. It is important that they have representation in stories because, as mentioned above, they face bullying, harassment and violence just because their identity isn’t understood. If the only people reading books with LGBTQ+ characters are those who are specifically seeking out LGBTQ+ reads, then the general public is missing out on a chance to read about someone different than themselves, and to develop empathy and acceptance. 

Furthermore, if we censored every title that someone didn’t like, there would be nothing left in the library! Censorship isn’t the answer.

Yes, some books contain content that is violent, profane, explicit, upsetting. Life also contains these things, unfortunately, no matter how safe we try to be. How can we learn about and discuss these topics if we can’t even read about them?

If you want to censor what your family sees, reads, and takes part in, that’s your choice as a parent, but that’s on YOU, not the library.

You want to bring your kids in to improve their reading skills, but that’s only one purpose of a library. Libraries are also places of programming, community, and tons more.

Please don’t boycott your library because it provides titles or programming that you do not appreciate. Talk to your library staff and librarians- I’m sure they can help you access many things that you WILL enjoy without restricting the access of others to content OTHERS might enjoy.

 

 

 

Advertisements

Freak Lunchbox

I’m visiting family in my hometown of Saint John, NB, and enjoying a few indulgences while I’m here. Last post I delved into Bob’s Corner Takeout. Today I want to show off another favorite spot in Saint John: the Freak Lunchbox.

dav

According to uptownsj.com, Freak Lunchbox is a family business that was founded in Halifax in 2001, “inspired by circus sideshows, roadside attractions and of course candy!”

The Freak Lunchbox location on King Street is tucked away across from Brunswick Square, near the harbour, in a small shop amidst historic buildings. The store is a claustrophobically colourful cave of sugar, novelties, and retro toys.

dav

The bulk candies are all named after memes and pop culture references- Unicorn Poop, I Like Turtles, Mom’s (Rainbow) Spaghetti, Nuka Cola bottles, and more. Visitors can grab a baggie or a takeout box and fill to their heart’s content, or choose from a variety of rare and imported candies, sodas, and chocolates that are individually wrapped.

dav

^I have a weakness for gummies, myself.

dav

^Check out the funky cereals and the giant raptor head!

While candy from the Freak Lunchbox is a bit pricier that what you might pay for sweets elsewhere, the place is still worth a visit for the wide variety and the kooky, kitschy atmosphere. I usually end up spending about $30- this time, for example, I left with a container full of gummies and nougat, 6 Cow Tails, a finger monster, and some plastic duck-feet.

 

 

 

Bob’s

Right now my hubby and I are visiting my family in New Brunswick, and every time we get home for a visit we try to make it to Bob’s. We popped over today for lunch.

Bob’s Corner Takeout in West Saint John isn’t a flashy place- it’s what you’d lovingly refer to as a dive, a hole-in-the-wall, complete with worn picnic tables and an eclectic decor made up of an assortment of faded wall prints and taxidermied ducks. There is a cosy charm to the spot.

My family has been visiting Bob’s since I was a young kid- well, probably earlier than that, actually. According to this CBC article, Bob’s is a family business that has been going strong at this location since around since 1985, before I was born.

While you wait for your food, you can browse through stacks of magazines that will take you back a couple of decades or so.

dav

Alternately, you can play an arcade game in the corner, or get out your quarters for the crank machines.

dav

Most people, however, return to Bob’s time and time again for the authentic and laid-back feel of the place, and of course, the food. When you step into Bob’s you can immediately smell the oil, and hear it sizzling in the friers at the back. You can expect an affordable, satisfying meal.

The menu has barely changed since I was a little girl, if at all. I can’t help but get the whole clams every time. The clams, in their light, crunchy batter, dunked in a little tartar sauce, still taste just as I remember.

dav

dav

My hubby Dustin got the hamburger today, so I got to try a bite of that too, and it was also amazingly good- a proper “smash burger” Dustin called it. Soft bun, gooey cheese, and simply a real grilled burger taste.

Bob and his family have many loyal and devoted customers. While for my family Bob’s is a rare treat, many people are regulars, and Bob’s is somewhat of a local landmark . When I posted my meal on Instagram, a family friend who lives in Alberta commented “I’d push (your father) down the stairs for some Bob’s.”

Yup, Bob’s is serious business.

Why Dad from Fallout 3 is Awesome

Happy Father’s Day!

I made a list of Favorite Fictional Moms on Mother’s day, so I figured I better do one for Father’s day lest my blog become horribly unbalanced!

For some reason it was harder to come up with a list of Favorite Fictional Fathers than Mothers… I don’t know if this says something about me, or about society, or maybe the entertainment industry? Who knows, but I decided to just write about Dad from Fallout 3, because who doesn’t love James?!

  • He cares

James is the only Dad who immediately came to mind when I began to reflect for this post a couple of weeks ago. Hes a talented doctor and scientist, and really just wants his kid to be happy (he even throws you a makeshift birthday party in the underground vault! Sure, it’s somber as hell, but at least he tried!)

6-Fallout3_2012-01-17_13-42-39-90

^”You should stay and enjoy your birthday party” the game reminds you if you try to leave. >.>

meankid

^Dad still loves you even when you’re a total ass.

  • His backstory is super cool.

    When James left his child behind, it was with safety in mind, and an important purpose for the betterment of all. Fallout 3 is still my favorite Fallout game, and I love the role that Dad plays. No spoilers, but if you haven’t played Fallout 3, you really should.

fallout

 

  • His Voice is The Best

    Dad is voiced by Liam Neeson (!) His quiet, reassuring voice is one you can’t help but love. ‘Nuff said.

liamne

  • Design of Dad

    Depending on how you design your character, his design will also change to look more like you. (While this SHOULD be the norm for video games, and perhaps more diversity options are emerging in gaming nowadays, that wasn’t always the case).

 

And there you have it! Everyone loves Dad. Or should. And if you don’t, be careful…

mememem

Happy Fathers day to all the dads out there!

Librarians, ghosts, mental-health & diverse characters: A Spoiler-Free Review of Archival Quality

Yesterday I was examining our library’s New Book display, as I am wont to do, and I noticed this book:

36140710.jpg

Graphic novels are one of my passions, so poked through it and soon realized that this book was SO relevant to my interests that I had to read it immediately.

It’s a book featuring:

  • diverse characters
  • ghosts and creepiness
  • a librarian as the main character
  • reflections on mental health

So, I scarfed it down on my lunch break!

Weir and Steenz have created a compelling mystery buoyed along by a wonderfully morbid setting and interesting characters. The style of the graphic art is lovely, and for that alone I’d be glad to have this book on my shelf.

Capture33^A poignant observation from the beginning of the book: If I had to visualize it, I’d say it makes me think about the walls that protect beach towns from flooding. The water rises and then retracts, and the wall holds, but it leaves line marks. You can tell it’s been there. You know it’s coming back.

There were a few places that the story fell a bit flat (some plot points needed further explanation or illustration, and the ending felt a tad rushed to me) but overall I enjoyed this story.

I give it 4 glaring skulls out of 5!

The Poppy War: Spoiler Free Review

Last night I finished The Poppy War by R.F. Kuang. This is the best fantasy book I’ve read in ages!

poppy war

A first glance at the cover and synopsis might lead a reader to believe that they are in for a sort of magic-school YA novel about a young girl rising through the ranks. While this story does touch on that sort of feel in the initial chapters, that is not the ride you are in for. This is a brutal war story.

Since I can’t explain it any better than this, here is what to expect in the author’s own words (from her Goodreads review of the book):

This book is not a romance story. This is not a YA fantasy school story (sorry. I love those too.) Yes, there’s a school, and we learn some things at the school, but please don’t let that description deceive you as we leave that setting quite quickly. 

This is, as I’ve always conceived it, a war story. It draws heavily on the Second Sino-Japanese war which–if you know anything about Asia–was one of the darkest and bloodiest moments in Chinese history. It grapples with the Rape of Nanjing. It deals heavily with opium and drug use. (Opium was a source of Chinese weakness. This book asks what would have happened if opium were instead a source of shamanic power.) This book is primarily about military strategy, collapsing empires, mad gods, and the human ability to make awful, ruthless decisions. It’s about how dictators are made. 

To be entirely frank, if you’re turned off by violence, I might pick up a different book. 

The Poppy War is captivating from start to finish. It went places I did not expect it to go. I was expecting this book to sort of set the scene for the war, perhaps leading into book two (the author says this series will be a trilogy). However, as is the way of war, it was upon me (and Rin) quicker than I expected.

While this story goes into war strategy, worldbuilding and politics, it is balanced with characters that are likeable, interesting, flawed, powerful, and confronted with terrible decisions. It is also refreshingly well-paced, sweeping you off your feet just when you thought you were starting to get comfortable.

In a lot of series the protagonist has an unshakable black-and-white sense of right and wrong, good and evil, whereas I love that in this series (as in real life) characters are faced with ethical questions that have no easy answers.

This book is now one of my top favorite fantasy stories. I won’t give anything away, but will just say this- after the ending of book 1, I am definitely eager to get my hands on book 2. I’ll be with Rin until the end, no matter where she goes or what choices she makes.

Spoiler-Free Review/Squeefest: Black Butler- A Book of the Atlantic

I finally got around to watching the new Black Butler film, A Book of the Atlantic. It’s been a little while since I watched anything Black Butler, and this movie reminded me why I love the series so much. I’ve enjoyed all previous installments, and this one has all the bits I love about Kuroshitsuji: dark and mysterious plot, bloody and dramatic fight scenes with witty repartee, and understated but impactful sprinklings of humour and fanservice.

118369^ Hey look, it’s Inspector Gadget! I mean, Ronald Knox…

All aboard the Campania! The Campania is essentially the Titanic, but with 3 smokestacks instead of 4. It’s a luxury liner on which Ciel, Sebastian, and a smattering of other favorites, embark on yet another mystery- this time involving a secret society and medical mishaps involving reanimation of the dead! (Read: Zombies.)

Although Ciel leaves his loyal house-servants (minus Sebastian, of course) at the docks, many other fan-favorites make an appearance in the movie, including Elizabeth and her family, Grell Sutcliff, Ronald Knox, Undertaker, Snake, and a few other surprises.

maxresdefault

Snake always cracks me up (anyone who is familiar with the series will know why). I especially loved the character development of Elizabeth- let’s just say I’m much more fond of her now! Undertaker also really surprised and delighted with his newest development.

Hero-Cut-2000x1200

The movie also gives viewers an intimate look into some unseen moments from the very beginnings of Ciel and Sebastian’s relationship, starting with the fateful deal that forms the basis of the entire series. As such, this movie is a treat for fans of Black Butler, but would also be enjoyable for people who have never seen previous episodes or spin-offs.

Highly recommended!

black-butler-book-of-the-atlantic-review-1-lg