The Characters That Define Us

Matt over at Normal Happenings has finally revealed the character choices for his biggest blog collab project ever, The Characters That Define Us. The epicness will kick off in January 2020, with each week of the year bringing a different blogger and their chosen game character to the forefront, including tailored Daily Inkling writing prompts, themes, artwork, and of course uniquely personal blog posts!

Each participant is doing a different character- I wanted to represent the avatars that I’ve created for various RPG games over time, so my character will be… Alternate Shauna! 

Without giving too much away, I will say that my contribution to this project will delve into the different types of characters I’ve created for role playing games of all sorts- from adventure games and MMORPG to more chill games like Stardew Valley, Animal Crossing and The Sims. In doing so, I hope to highlight how creating these alternate versions of myself has given me new ways to express myself throughout my life, as well as virtual role-models to look up to.

Thanks again to Matt for preparing this awesome collaborative project! This will be something fun to look forward to in the new year!

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Nerds at a Table Episode 1 Is Here!

Recently I blogged about a new project my friends and I have been working on with Shaw TV- a show called Nerds at a Table. Well, the first episode is now out online! In this episode we try out the card game Superfight and are joined by our first special guest, Zachary. Watch as we struggle to fight and maintain glory with Spartan Belieber, Misty Lincoln, Robo-clones and other such shenanigans.

 

Fun fact: Zach is a performer, role-play master, and co-founder of Twisted Gears Studios. He is also a kind friend and funny dude, and stars in another local nerdy labour of love, Nerdvana the Webseries!

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If you’d like to keep up with all of our dorkiness at Nerds At A Table, please follow us on Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram! I hope you enjoy our series as much as we’ve enjoyed filming it!

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Bad Romance: A Defense of Reprehensible Love Interests in Otome and Beyond

My prince charming is your worst nightmare.

From the age that I can first remember feeling the pangs of infatuation and lust in my mid-teens, I found I had a taste for rogues, tricksters, baddies, and miscreants. In books, movies, manga, anime, and otome games, I rarely go for the hero of the story- my affections are generally reserved for the evil adversary, mysterious secondary character, or perhaps the dangerously playful womanizing side-kick. These characters are often sexy but would ultimately make terrible romantic partners in real life.

Recently I’ve been noticing in comment sections all over the internet well-intentioned people decrying these very sorts of characters that I am drawn to. Fans and non-fans alike are calling out reprehensible actions of characters as they see them. I think this is a positive reflection of wider discussions and movements that are happening worldwide right now regarding healthy relationships, love, affection, sex, and consent. These honest reflections on characters, from Sabrina’s Father Blackwood to the Sakamaki family of Diabolik Lovers, are valuable and worth noting. The relationships you see on TV or other media are often not good examples for real-life relationships to follow- sometimes these sorts of characters stray into cruel or even verbally and/or physically abusive behavior.

However, I do not believe that the answer is to eliminate such characters from the stories we tell and worlds we create.

One area that gets a lot of heat for these sorts of characters is otome games- perhaps because they are simulating a relationship with the player. Games like these feel more intimate than watching a movie or reading a book: usually a player uses their real first name in-game to enhance the immersion, voice-actors use dummy-head mics to record sound like they are right beside your ear whispering sweet nothings through your headphones, and choices in the game lead to consequences for the character you play as well as other characters in the game.

The first true otome game I played was Code: Realize, Guardian of Rebirth. It’s an interactive visual novel with a Victorian steampunk aesthetic, excellent Japanese voice acting, and odes to famous historical figures throughout.

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Code: Realize

A common strategy for playing otome games is play the main route with the main love interest first (often he’s featured on the cover, as with this example featuring Arsene Lupin) and then branch out to other romantic partners in subsequent play-throughs.

However, I always gravitate immediately towards the character that (you guessed it) is strange, aloof, mean, temperamental, and/or seemingly sinister. In Code: Realize, I went for Saint-Germain, an intriguing and mysterious white-haired gentleman voiced by my favorite voice actor, Daisuke Hirakawa.

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Saint Germain still image from Code:Realize, Guardian of Rebirth

*Warning:  spoilers ahead!*

My interest in Saint only grew as his complex and tragic story slowly unwound, with seemingly no means of a happy end. Still, I was caught completely off-guard when my first play-through ended abruptly with that is probably considered the worst possible ending you can get in the game: he murdered me.

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Scene from Code Realize, Guardian of Rebirth

I was shocked, bemused, and strangely thrilled by this sudden turn of events. Retracing my steps and choosing different directions on my second play-through, I discovered that he had some solid legitimate reasons for killing my character (really!) and in the less tragic story-lines he is actually a gentle, devoted, caring partner, despite a crushingly brutal past that haunts his every step.

Aside from his bad-ending (murder…) route, Saint is actually not particularly problematic, so I’d like to present a more blatant example of the “reprehensible love interest”…

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Diabolik Lovers, by Rejet

Diabolik Lovers began as an otome visual novel game franchise, but has since been turned into manga, anime, a stage musical, and tons of drama cds and merchandise in Japan. I stumbled upon the subbed anime on Crunchyroll a few years ago, starting a personal infatuation with this vampire series- a series featuring characters that are unabashedly terrible in their treatment of the female protagonist, Yui.

Yui is a Mary-Sue type character often seen in otome series-  aside from some rare moments of tenacity, she is presented as an unremarkable, quiet, polite young lady. She’s a sort of vanilla stand-in for the viewer or player, one which they can easily replace with themselves.

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Her potential suitors, on the other hand, are some very strong personalities. Their dispositions differ widely, ranging from hysterical and possessive to dismissive and toying. What unites all of the Sakamaki boys, though, is the way they all cruelly use and abuse Yui to sate their thirsts for blood and amusement.

Some hardcore fans will argue that by the end of the plotline their favorite boy truly loves Yui and is deeply devoted to her, but let’s be real here: that doesn’t excuse the abuse, and nobody is compelled to watch the Dialover anime or play the Dialover games because of the romance. The average viewer would be repelled by the sadistic, narcissistic, misogynistic and psychopathic actions of the Sakamaki family (some of my friends certainly are). The Sakamaki brothers each in turn physically restrain Yui, attack her verbally and physically (mainly through biting and taking her blood against her will) and deceive her naive and trusting nature unendingly. Each boy has a different demeaning nickname for Yui (Pancake, Sow, Bitch-chan, and so on…). So why are some people, like myself, drawn to these characters who are obviously toxic?

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This scene from Watamote is literally me T-T

This conundrum has fascinated me for some time. Why am I attracted to characters in fantasy that would make me miserable in real life? Is this predilection linked to the dark triad of features that supposedly signal a capable mate, triggering some biological response in me? Am I simply bored by predictable good guys and their chivalry? Is it pure masochism on my part? While not everyone falls for the charms of the bad boy, i’m certainly not unique in this regard, and there are lots of potential reasons someone might be willingly pulled over to the dark side.

Whatever the reason, the truth is that I and many others enjoy these sorts of flawed, dangerous, cruel characters, even when they are at their worst. While I understand the criticisms of series like Diabolik Lovers,  I believe we mustn’t equate a portrayal of an abusive or problematic fictional character with the actions of a person in real life or an endorsement of these kinds of relationships.

It’s okay to enjoy a romantic fantasy, even a dark and twisted one.

I am an advocate for the freedom to read, write, and create without restrictions. No work will be pleasing to everyone, and some may find certain works distasteful, but we must remember that these stories are fictional. When I immerse myself in an otome game, it is my choice, and I can withdraw my consent from the experience at any time by pressing the “power off” button on my Vita. I don’t confuse the tangled relationships in the fictional stories I enjoy with my real life relationships, which are thankfully much less dramatic than the ones I read, watch, and play.


 

Abuse is wrong. Verbal, physical, and sexual abuse have no place in a healthy relationship. Consent is vital. I don’t condone abuse in real life.

The fantasy world of books, movies, and video games are a space where the dangerous sides of love and lust can be explored safely- the cat and mouse game, which is exciting in theory but potentially devastating in real life, can be enjoyed in a make-believe format in which the consumer controls (while enjoying being “controlled” artificially).

We can and should continue to reflect on characters, and each person can determine for themselves what they enjoy or do not enjoy reading, watching, or playing, but there should be no shame for enjoying reprehensible love interests in fiction!

 

Why Dad from Fallout 3 is Awesome

Happy Father’s Day!

I made a list of Favorite Fictional Moms on Mother’s day, so I figured I better do one for Father’s day lest my blog become horribly unbalanced!

For some reason it was harder to come up with a list of Favorite Fictional Fathers than Mothers… I don’t know if this says something about me, or about society, or maybe the entertainment industry? Who knows, but I decided to just write about Dad from Fallout 3, because who doesn’t love James?!

  • He cares

James is the only Dad who immediately came to mind when I began to reflect for this post a couple of weeks ago. Hes a talented doctor and scientist, and really just wants his kid to be happy (he even throws you a makeshift birthday party in the underground vault! Sure, it’s somber as hell, but at least he tried!)

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^”You should stay and enjoy your birthday party” the game reminds you if you try to leave. >.>

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^Dad still loves you even when you’re a total ass.

  • His backstory is super cool.

    When James left his child behind, it was with safety in mind, and an important purpose for the betterment of all. Fallout 3 is still my favorite Fallout game, and I love the role that Dad plays. No spoilers, but if you haven’t played Fallout 3, you really should.

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  • His Voice is The Best

    Dad is voiced by Liam Neeson (!) His quiet, reassuring voice is one you can’t help but love. ‘Nuff said.

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  • Design of Dad

    Depending on how you design your character, his design will also change to look more like you. (While this SHOULD be the norm for video games, and perhaps more diversity options are emerging in gaming nowadays, that wasn’t always the case).

 

And there you have it! Everyone loves Dad. Or should. And if you don’t, be careful…

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Happy Fathers day to all the dads out there!